The Dry Age Difference – What does Dry Aged Steak taste like and how is it different from a normal steak?

Wagyu (450 days) - Ribeye

AGED by The Meat & Wine Co has introduced a premium new dining experience for Australian steak lovers, a selection of expertly aged steaks that showcase the quality and finesse of this exceptional dish.

Taking approximately two months in total, the dry ageing proces is a highly controlled system that removes the moisture from the steak, amplifies the flavour, and greatly enhances the tenderness of already-tender cuts of beef.

And from the specialised humidity and temperature controlled fridge ager, to the expert training and skill of our chefs, the entire process is designed to vastly improve the flavours and textures of steak that has already been selected for its exceptional natural qualities well before the ageing treatment.

Here’s what you can expect from the result.

What does dry aged steak taste like?

Much like standard steak, dry aged beef can vary in flavour depending on both the original cut of steak that was chosen for ageing, and on the amount of time it has spent ageing.

For example, we offer wagyu, monte, and shorthorn beef, and a variety of fillets, ribeyes, rumps, and rump eyes to cater to steak connoisseurs who prefer a range to choose from.

While the underlying steak cut flavours are the basis of dry aged meat, the ‘aged’ taste overlaying those is something new. Aged steak typically tastes decidedly beefy, much like a rare roast beef, while also taking on subtler hints of other delicious flavours, such as warm buttered popcorn. It can also taste somewhat nutty, and can sometimes veer into the cheesy category.

Generally speaking, the longer a steak is aged, the more pungent and powerful it becomes. This flavour intensifies and becomes potent, much like an aged cheese. Steaks aged for as long as 90 days, or even 120 days, are uncommon as they take even more time and preparation to create.

You can also slightly infuse the steak with a flavour, using the fat or butter than it is aged in. Our current specialty dish is our 120-day aged, grass-fed monte beef, which has been prepared with an exquisite black garlic-infused Wagyu butter. This does not change the flavour of the steak but instead adds a subtle indulgent infusion of flavour.

Aside from flavour alone, a real hallmark of dry aged beef is its texture. During the ageing process, the connective tissues within the muscle actually break down, resulting in a steak so tender that you barely need a steak knife to cut it – it practically melts in your mouth.

How does dry aged steak compare with normal steak?

A cut of aged steak can look reasonably similar to a standard cut, yet overall, aged meat is simply richer, beefier, and considerably more tender than standard steaks. There’s a notable difference in every bite, with a ‘melt-in-your-mouth’ moment. This is why so many steak lovers and food connoisseurs seek out the leading fine dining restaurants and expert chefs, looking for more premium dining experiences with this unparalleled dish.

If you’re ready to discover dry aged steak for yourself, make a booking at your nearest Meat & Wine Co to enjoy exquisite dry aged beef, and change your perception of incredible steak forever.

Share this!

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest
Share on linkedin

In this article:

You might like

Related Posts

Dry Aged Steak – Top 10 FAQs

Dry aged steak is on everyone’s lips this year – physically and metaphorically.

This trending dish has become immensely popular in recent years as chefs have increased their knowledge not just in how to make it, but how to perfect it, too.

But what is dry aged steak exactly, and what does it taste like? Read on to discover all the answers to these FAQs and more!